2016 NCMATYC Presentations

40 presentations have been accepted for the 2016 NCMATYC Conference!  Rooms are still available for presenters, so please take a moment to send in a presentation.  Also, we would like to stream presentations to the 2016 NCMATYC conference, which would also allow presentations to be viewed for those who are not able to attend.  So, if you can’t make the conference but would like to have your presentation streamed via a WebVideoChat, then please let us know.

More information about the 2016 Conference can be found here.  The following are titles and descriptions of the accepted presentations.

Globalizing Non-stem courses A DCCC program, Scholars of Global Distinction, recognizes students for their commitment to understanding global issues through coursework, presentations, and a global experience. Instructors have since globalized MAT 143. We will share labs, the creation process, and relevance.
Take it up Notch: Adding Rigor to DMA DMA students are in developmental courses not just for content, but also to learn general college competencies such as note-taking and using available resources. DCCC instructors share DMA policies that promote students success in gateway math courses.
DMS Success at Edgecombe Community College This presentation will consist of the set up and delivery of North Carolina’s Eight Developmental Mathematics Shells as an emporium Model. The date from Fall 2015 semester will be incuded.
Using Google Forms to Collect Data How much better would the instruction be if students were able to use data they themselves collected. By using Google Forms and Google Sheets, we can collect data from both individuals and groups quickly and easily, and have class sets to analysis.
The Colored Dice Problem- MAT 152 This talk will be a brief demonstration of a probability experiment involving dice and their colors that will engage and challenge your students.
12th Annual Faculty Math League Competition Put yourselves in your students’ shoes and come and try your hand at these 15 questions modeled after the Student Math League Test. Prizes will be awarded to the top the finishers!
Working on those Abs Students have difficulties with the concept of absolute value equations and inequalities. A review of some textbook methods and an alternative method will be discussed along with student responses to various exercises concerning their understanding of absolute value exercises.
Meaningful Labs Using Real Data Sets Presenter will share labs that use real data and explore appropriate technology for computations. Each participant will leave with labs that can be used immediately in a Statistic or Quantitative Literacy course.
Collaborative Learning in Online Classes Student/student interaction has been shown to be an important success strategy for students in online classes. This session will present activities that have been used to get students working collaboratively in online classes.
Rising and Running with Math Caching Participants will experience a Math Caching Hunt. The presenters will explain how they applied this type of Scavenger Hunt into their courses. Examples and resources will be provided.
Implementation of MAT001 This session will discuss the development, and implementation of MAT001-Supplemental Labs for PreCalculus and Statistics at CPCC. The presentation will include class structure and sample course material.
Differential Equations: Let’s get this party started In this session, I will share how I introduce differential equations to my students. We will explore differential equations using many modes of representation including symbolic, numeric and graphic approaches within context of real world applications.
WebAssign: Powerful Resource for your Classroom Are you a new, potential, or seasoned WebAssign user? Join us and explore the latest free math and stats resources and learn about our new analytics features; as well as our student-paced course model, all designed to enrich the teaching and learning experience.
Bringing Statistical Methods 1 Into the 21st Century In this session, we will explore several free media tools to instruct students in 21st century visualization and analysis with the ultimate goal of producing better, more informed consumers of statistics. This session will align with SLO #6 of the MAT 152 curriculum.
Rising to the DMA Challenge…Conceptually Finding ways to help students better see the need for learning the basic concepts in developmental mathematics continues to be the biggest challenge of my career; I try to find new ideas and ways to teach the same content…turning on the lightbulb of learning.
New MAT 171 Labs Come hear how we have encouraged students explore, apply, & synthesize Pre-Calculus topics through lab work. You will leave this session with labs in hand and access to their digital formats.
Engaging Students: From High School to Community College Are you interested in improving communication with your local high schools? We will highlight a project designed to: increase collaboration between faculty, increase enrollment in AAS programs, and motivate students by showing real math apps. Specific applications will be shown.
Time for Something New? Let’s Talk Hawkes Hawkes Learning has enhanced its courseware, building new functionality for customization with the feedback of instructors from across the country! Exciting innovations are now available with our tablet-friendly learning platform. Enter to win a $25 Amazon gift card!
MAT 143 – for the very first time! Having all taught MAT 143 for the very first time this year, we will talk about our experience – from how we set up groups, grading group work, holding students accountable in the group process, the labs that worked and those that did not, weekly team meetings, and more.
Using Tangent to Design a Passive Solar House This talk will begin with a brief overview of what passive solar design means, and continue on to demonstrate how tangent is used to calculate the solar gain during the summer and winter.
Effective DMA lab exercises to prepare for the MAT classroom Many MAT courses in our system use lab exercises. We will work through some labs we have implemented in DMA to help our students prepare for MAT. We will discuss the pros and cons of labs and work through some examples. You will walk away with a lab ready to go for each module.
Different Instructional Models That Made A Difference Instructional models, Structured & Redesign, have resulted in significant differences in student success rates. Outcomes are attributed to factors including: interactive learning resources, customization of courses, 24 X 7 support, & powerful grading & assessment options.
What’s on Tap? MindTap for Math and Stats by Cengage Learning This lively session will showcase Cengage’s new digital learning solution for math and statistics. Learn how we have put “students first” with MindTap, which better fits the lifestyle of today’s students, helping them to increase retention and develop critical thinking skills.
History and Calculus: The Brilliance of Leonhard Euler To say that Leonhard Euler was a mathematical genius is an understatement. Come discover how Euler determined the exact value of 1 + 1/4 + 1/9 + … + 1/k^2 + … This brilliant proof is quite elegant and creative, yet readily understandable by your Calculus II class.
Using SAGE, a free CAS in the cloud, for Mathematics We demonstrate how SAGE can be used in any level of the precalulus-calculus sequence. Sample files and tutorial links will be made available.
Poll Vaulting to Quantitative Literacy My talk will be based on North Carolina MAT 143 objective 4.9: Polling and margin of error. I’ll walk through an activity-based lesson designed to cover this objective in an engaging and interactive way.
Quantitative Literacy in Our World We spent almost two years working with faculty in NC to develop a product designed to meet the specific objectives of MAT 143. We’re ready to publish for this Fall and are eager to show off the results. See what our project is about, and share your thoughts on 143 with us.
Preparing for Calculus: Less is More; Deeper is Better This talk will suggest (without prescribing) that we can best prepare students for calculus by teaching them fewer things, and teaching them more thoroughly. This approach agrees with the SLOs for math students at my school. I shall offer a few examples of useful exercises.
Math Skills Lab and How to Please the Auditors Frustrated trying to please the state auditors without written guidelines for a math skills lab? Come learn basics of successful labs from a coordinator with no audit exceptions in 5 years. Take home forms and information that will keep you in the good graces of any auditor.
May the Force of Math be With You! Star Wars is an icon of our society, but lots of “fun” math can be derived from this epic saga. Flying time from Coruscant to Tatooine, energy of a Light Saber and other galactic shattering questions will be addressed here. Suitable for Math 143, Math 171 and Math 172.
Hands-On Activities in Linear Algebra Linear algebra has many uses and often students are surprised of uses beyond solving systems. Hands-on activities that introduce and reinforce linear algebra concepts while engaging students will be demonstrated.
Improving Review Sessions Reviewing for a test can be fun! Try a review strategy with a format similar to the Amazing Race seen on TV. Students work in groups and must answer questions correctly in order to proceed. Wrong answers are met with “detours” and the first group to the finish line wins!
Stories of Student Learning Outcomes If a student creates and presents a story about an SLO, will they retain it better in the following semesters? I will discuss how to set up an Ignite format of “What is your math story?”, where students give 2 minute talks about what they’ve found to be awesome in a certain SLO.
Transforming the Teaching of Transformations Come participate in a set of activities that can be used to achieve the SLO of parent function transformations. I will share how to use parametric equations to show the transformations of coordinate points and how to manipulate graph paper to show the transformations of y=f(x).
ALEKs: A Web-based Assessment & Learning Program ALEKS is a web-based assessment & learning program that uses artificial intelligence to determine precisely what each student knows & doesn’t know, and then presents to each student what they are ready to learn.
Introducing Bayesian Reasoning in a Statistics Course Bayesian statistical inference is typically not introduced until a calculus-based mathematical statistics course. However, by extending a basic discussion of Bayes’ Theorem, an accessible introduction to the topic can be made at any level.
Quantitative Activities for MAT 143 Writing activities for MAT 143 that engage the students and help them think critically is a challenge. Presenters will share Wake Tech activities and investigate ways to improve them to increase critical thinking.
Can You Budget? When introducing your students to financial literacy skills as an application of mathematics, how do you test the knowledge they gained? Through this talk, we’ll explore a budgeting exercise to test their knowledge.
Real World Projects for PreCalculus and Calculus Students often question how the mathematics they are learning in class will be used in the ‘real world’. Come see a variety of projects that we have developed over time to help address this very question. Topics include periodic modeling, vectors, conics, and optimization.
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NCMATYC Student Scholarship Nominee

Congratulations to William Reese! He will be the NCMATYC nominee for the AMATYC President Student Scholarship. William Reese attends Wake Tech and was nominated by Joan Romano.

Will Reese

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2015 NCMATYC Math Competition

The following is a post by Chris Mansfield, Student Math League Coordinator.

I hope everyone’s school year is starting off well. I know you all are busy this time of year but I wanted to send information about the 2015 NCMATYC Math Competition as soon I as could in order to give you time to make appropriate preparations.

The 6th annual competition will be held at Central Carolina Community College in Sanford, NC on Saturday, November 14th. It is open to all colleges; students are eligible as long as they have not had any courses above the sophomore level. More information, along with links to the 2015 registration form and links to past winners and copies of old tests, can be found on the NCMATYC website here: http://ncmatyc.matyc.org/competitions/ncmatyc-math-competition/

Feel free to look over these materials and send me any questions you have about the competition. Also, if you think your school is likely to come please let me know even if you are not ready to officially register–it would be helpful to us for planning purposes.

Also—and this is very important—it would be a huge help if you or someone at your school would be willing to submit questions for the competition. The more folks we have submitting questions, the more varied (and simply better) the competition questions will be. Please let me know if you are willing to help out. Thanks.

We are really looking forward to this year’s competition–hope you’ll be able to make it!​

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MAT143 Opportunity

The following opportunity is by Sharilyn Ownens of Forsyth Tech.

MAT 143 Digital Learning Experience Contribution Competition Announcement:
Thank you for your interest in our collective digital learning experience. Forsyth Tech has funding to provide a stand-alone online resource for Quantitative Literacy. We are excited about this opportunity to provide our students with a textbook free course, thereby making a college education even more accessible. Colleges across the state may make this resource available to their students at no cost to them as well, if they so choose.

The purpose of this competition is to generate content for this course. We are collecting ideas and content, that stimulates critical thinking, has real-world connection, is creative, and incorporates mathematical thinking in everyday life within the context of MAT 143. Please see this promo video to view examples of the kinds of work our instructional design team is doing.  https://youtu.be/0ywsnla1P9A

Your submission will be reviewed by a team of Quantitative Literacy faculty, both internal and external to Forsyth Tech.  This will be a double blind review process. Do NOT have any words or terms that will reveal your name or institution. Please send your submission to Kamar Ogburn at kogburn@forsythtech.edu  with subject line “MAT 143 Contribution” using the cover sheet at the foot of this document. The deadline for submission is June 30, 2015.

If you have questions, please send an email to Courtney Harrington at charrington@forsythtech.edu with the subject line, “MAT 143 contribution question”
Guidelines:

  1. Participants are allowed to make multiple contributions, and since it is a double blind process, participants’ work may also be selected multiple times for prize money.
  2.  All resources must be open source and creative commons licensed resources.
    This limits the images, video, text etc. that may be incorporated into a valid submission.
    This is the link to the attribution license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
    And this is a link to a search for finding open source materials (in order for us to include it, the materials should be public domain or attribution licensed, also known as CC BY) http://search.creativecommons.org/
    Submissions will be properly attributed but licensed under a creative commons attribution license. This means you will be given credit, but we will allow the materials to be revised under the license terms above.
  3. With your submission, you agree that your contribution can be used with credit for the digital learning experience, regardless of competition outcome.
  4. Submit your contribution in a word document with text, activity idea, explanation and content necessary for instructional designers to input into software. You may also submit idea for video.
  5. There are two levels of competition: One $250 winner per each of 4 units that is a full module which addresses one learning outcome from the table below.
    1. Premium contributions will include full text of content, formative and summative assessment (for example: self-check questions and answers, activity, game, animation, lab and answers, quiz and answers), idea for video and ideas for interactive exercises.
    2. Five $50 winners per unit.
      A component (such as one lab, animation, video, summative assessment, formative assessment, activity, complete text).  Please use this template for your cover sheet. The administrative assistant will remove this cover and assign your submission a number.  Do NOT include any elements within the context of your submission that will identify you or your institution.

Submission deadline is June 30, 2015

Your name:

Your institution:

The number of the learning outcome your submission addresses. If this could be used in multiple places, list the one where you would use this lesson.  See the list below.
Choose one learning outcome number:

Check one:
_____ My submission is a complete module for one learning outcome ($250 prize level)

_____My submission is one component for one learning outcome ($50 prize level)
I agree that with this submission, I am giving permission for my work to be used as submitted, or modified, for the digital learning experience for Quantitative Literacy.

Signature:___________________________________________________________

Printed name: _______________________________________________________
Please include directions in this space for how you would like your work attributed.

Unit 1: Conquering Quantity

1.1 Compare the relative sizes and scales of numbers (from the microscopic to astronomical) in order to better comprehend the relevance of these figures encountered in media and academic contexts.
1.2 Utilize dimensional analysis to execute proper unit conversions which may include dosage and concentration calculations.
1.3 Judge the reasonableness of results using estimation, logical processes, and a proper understanding of quantity.
1.4 Using current media and data resources, interpret percentages given in tables, charts and graphs in terms of their bases; i.e. “percentage of what?”
1.5 Interpret and translate between various representations of ratios encountered in context; e.g., decimals, fractions, rates, percentages, etc.
1.6 Calculate proportions and rates to make meaningful comparisons e.g., Simpson’s Paradox, that are relevant to everyday life.
1.7 Analyze methods of apportionment and their effects on representation.

Unit 2: Dealing with Data and Uncertainty
2.1 Compute experimental probabilities using basic laws of probability.
2.2 Given a two-way table of real world data, calculate probabilities involving AND, OR and NOT statements and conditional probabilities.
2.3 Given the rate of occurrence of a disorder and sensitivity or specificity of a test for said disorder construct a two-way table that models the number of occurrences for a given sample size.
2.4 Given real world probability data or odds relating to games of chance, insurance policies, etc, calculate the expected value for a specified outcome.  Use expected value to justify decisions for given scenarios.
2.5 Describe data values in real world contexts using appropriate measures of central tendency and spread.
2.6 Given data from a media source, use technology to construct one or more of the following types of graphs: histogram, box-plot, stack-plot, time-series, scatterplot or pie chart.
2.7 Interpret a variety of basic and sophisticated graphics from media sources.
2.8 Given a mean and standard deviation of a distribution determine the z-score and percentile of a given data point and communicate this information in a meaningful sentence.
2.9 Explain the meaning of a poll or study provides the margin of error and confidence level.
2.10 Compare and contrast observational and experimental studies and critique how the design influences the conclusions drawn.

Unit 3: Contending with Change
3.1 Compute and analyze rates of change (percentage, absolute, average) from selected tables and graphs.
3.2 Use growth rates to analyze quantitative data in various contexts including real world data, student generated data or data found in current media.
3.3 Use Interpolation and Extrapolation of real world data and describe when each is appropriately used.
3.4 Critique the construction of graphs, charts and visual displays of quantitative information which may be misleading.
3.5 Given linear and exponential data, interpret the rate of change within the given context.
3.6 Represent linear and exponential models as equations, tables, graphs and verbal descriptions.
3.7 Use technology to construct the appropriate linear or exponential models for sets of data and interpret the rate of change using appropriate units.
3.8 Identify data that models constant rates of change and explain the significance of either the absolute or relative change.
3.9 Using current media sources, describe the significance and implications of exponential growth or decay.

Unit 4: Managing Money
4.1 Use the ideas of linear and exponential functions to develop the concepts of simple and compound interest.
4.2 Calculate simple and compound interest.
4.3 Show the difference between APR and APY.
4.4 Model and analyze different savings plans and their outcomes.
4.5 Use online tools to determine payments on consumer loans.
4.6 Create amortization tables using technology, exploring various scenarios, and communicate conclusions.
4.7 Ask appropriate questions about loan terms.
4.8 Explore and analyze a variety of consumer loans considering individual budget constraints and communicate findings.
4.9 Examine credit card terminology, perform basic credit card computations, and evaluate pay off options.
4.10 Interpret financial terminology used by various types of media involving taxes, stocks, and bonds.
4.11 Compute and compare income taxes for various situations such as income bracket, marital status, credits and deductions.

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Newsletter and Stats from Conference.

As the 2014-2015 school year comes to a close, many experiences have happened in your classroom.  What better way to share than to add one of them to the upcoming newsletter.  The due date to send an article is April 24th.  Please email the article to board.

Plenty of information about the 2o15 conference can be found here.  Be sure to check out the video of Jennifer Brown’s presentation.  Also, some presenters have added their material to the online program.  Check them out.

Posted in 2015 NCMATYC Conference | Leave a comment